Contested Divorce

A contested divorce is one where the spouses don’t agree on how to settle the terms of their divorce. Whether it be who gets the family house, how to divide retirement funds, a contested divorce is marked by disagreement.  Luckily, this is a pretty normal situation to be in—after all, most couples can barely agree on anything while married, let alone during a breakup—and, just

Divorce Complaint

You may have mentally committed to the idea of getting a divorce—maybe you’re even already separated—however, no matter what your mental conviction, a Tennessee divorce doesn’t officially start until a complaint is filed. A divorce complaint (commonly referred to as a “petition for divorce”), is a legal document that notifies the court you want a divorce, tells them why, and asks for their help in

Final Divorce Order

Let’s be honest: splitting one life into two isn’t easy. When you get divorced, there will be a lot of important decisions being made, and—between property, debt, children, alimony, retirement accounts (not to mention, family pets)—a lot to keep track of, too. Luckily, there’s one document you can turn to that will have all the answers… and we mean, of course, your final divorce order. 

Grounds for Divorce

In the United States, there are two types of divorce: at fault, and no-fault. One process attempts to lay blame, while the other allows couples to go their separate ways without holding either party accountable.  Fault and no-fault divorces are triggered by what grounds you list in your divorce complaint. These grounds are a required part of filing for divorce, and will ultimately play a

Fault-Based Divorce in Tennessee

In a fault-based divorce, judges are allowed to consider the guilt of one party, and hold them financially responsible for the marriage breakup. In most jurisdictions, this accountability typically results in the uneven division of marital property.  Here’s what you need to know about filing for fault-based divorce in Tennessee, and what the Byrd Law team can do to help figure out if it’s right

Collaborative Divorce

Divorce—like marriage—doesn’t come in a one-size-fits-all package. In fact, there are actually several different types of divorce to choose from, and not all have to be as emotionally toxic as a full court trial.  For couples who want a more amicable split, and are willing to engage in positive, constructive communication, collaborative divorce might be a good option. This type of divorce focuses on avoiding

Default Divorce

When we think about divorce, we often assume that it involves two willing participants, who—more or less—both want the same thing (i.e.: to terminate their marriage). But what happens if your other half doesn’t want a divorce? Or, if they just can’t be located?  Fortunately, the state of Tennessee isn’t going to make you stay married, just because your spouse might not be around to

Types of Divorce

You’ve probably heard the phrase, “There’s more than one way to skin a cat.” While we aren’t sure why anyone would actually want to do that (skin a cat, that is), when it comes to divorce, the saying applies aptly. After all, marriage isn’t a one-size-fits-all situation, so why should divorce be any different? While each type of divorce has the same end result (i.e.:

Collaborative Divorce

Divorce—like marriage—doesn’t come in a one-size-fits-all package. In fact, there are actually several different types of divorce to choose from, and not all have to be as emotionally toxic as a full court trial.  For couples who want a more amicable split, and are willing to engage in positive, constructive communication, collaborative divorce might be a good option. This type of divorce focuses on avoiding

How to Start a Divorce in Tennessee

You know you want a divorce, but you’re stuck. You stay because the thought of going to court exhausts you. You’re afraid for your kids. Of what people might say. You can’t even think about attorney’s fees without getting physically ill, and even if all of that weren’t true, the truth is: you don’t even know where to start. If this sounds like you, you’re

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